Review Copy Received: Maile Arvin’s Possessing Polynesians: The Science of Settler Colonial Whiteness in Hawai’i and Oceania

ARB regularly posts updates about review copies—print and digital—received by the editors and available for review. We receive this as a result of editor-direct outreach to presses to inquire about specific books and topics, as well as via our page describing review copy policy, available here.


Update (9.22.2020): A reviewer has been secured for this book.

ARB has received a digital review copy of Maile Arvin‘s new book Possessing Polynesians: The Science of Settler Colonial Whiteness in Hawai’i and Oceania from Duke University Press.

If you are interested in reviewing this book—particularly if you are an #ownvoices Hawai’ian and/or Pasifika writer or critic; or a scholar of whiteness, race, and colonialism—please reach out to the editors to express your interest in reviewing the book for ARB.

From the publisher:

From their earliest encounters with Indigenous Pacific Islanders, white Europeans and Americans asserted an identification with the racial origins of Polynesians, declaring them to be racially almost white and speculating that they were of Mediterranean or Aryan descent.

In Possessing Polynesians Maile Arvin analyzes this racializing history within the context of settler colonialism across Polynesia, especially in Hawai‘i. Arvin argues that a logic of possession through whiteness animates settler colonialism, by which both Polynesia (the place) and Polynesians (the people) become exotic, feminized belongings of whiteness. Seeing whiteness as indigenous to Polynesia provided white settlers with the justification needed to claim Polynesian lands and resources. Understood as possessions, Polynesians were and continue to be denied the privileges of whiteness. Yet Polynesians have long contested these classifications, claims, and cultural representations, and Arvin shows how their resistance to and refusal of white settler logic have regenerated Indigenous forms of recognition.

The author, Maile Arvin,

is Assistant Professor of History and Gender Studies at the University of Utah.

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