What Does It Mean to Grieve?: Review of The Impossible Resurrection of Grief by Octavia Cade

What Does it Mean to Grieve?: Review of The Impossible Resurrection of Grief by Octavia Cade Shelby Brewster Under Review: The Impossible Resurrection of Grief. By Octavia Cade. Stelliform Press, May 20, 2021. Content Warning: Suicide Octavia Cade’s new novella, The Impossible Resurrection of Grief, is, appropriately, the story of a pandemic. A vague psychological … Continue reading What Does It Mean to Grieve?: Review of The Impossible Resurrection of Grief by Octavia Cade

Wayward Lives and Paper Hearts: Review of The Chosen and the Beautiful by Nghi Vo

Wayward Lives and Paper Hearts: Review of The Chosen and the Beautiful by Nghi Vo Sam Botz Under Review: The Chosen and the Beautiful. By Nghi Vo. Tordotcom, June 6, 2021. Jordan Baker has a gift for listening, for drawing out others’ secret truths like spun sugar, but rarely is she told a story with … Continue reading Wayward Lives and Paper Hearts: Review of The Chosen and the Beautiful by Nghi Vo

Dehumanized Labor: Review of Machinehood by S.B. Divvya

Dehumanized Labor: Review of Machinehood by S.B. Divya Shinjini Dey Under Review: Machinehood. By S.B. Divya. Gallery/Saga Press, 2021. S.B. Divya’s Machinehood opens with a jibe about the moniker “smart”, quickly moving to the streets of Chennai and to our protagonist, Welga—an culinary aesthete, an atheist, and a prominent cis woman with an implanted artificial … Continue reading Dehumanized Labor: Review of Machinehood by S.B. Divvya

The Kids are Alright: Review of The House in the Cerulean Sea by TJ Klune

The Kids are Alright: Review of The House in the Cerulean Sea by TJ Klune Ibtisam Ahmed Under Review: The Cerulean Sea. T.J. Klune. Tor Books, 2020. It was with a level of trepidation that I pitched the review for The House in the Cerulean Sea. When a book is so meaningful, so poignant and … Continue reading The Kids are Alright: Review of The House in the Cerulean Sea by TJ Klune

Dangerous Knowledge in the Garden: Review of The Echo Wife by Sarah Gailey

Dangerous Knowledge in the Garden: Review of The Echo Wife by Sarah Gailey Jake Casella Brookins Under Review: The Echo Wife. Sarah Gailey. Tor Books, 2021. Cloning has been used for horrific effect back to at least Brave New World (1932), focusing on its “unnaturalness” and the uncanniness of the doppelgänger, and was foreshadowed in … Continue reading Dangerous Knowledge in the Garden: Review of The Echo Wife by Sarah Gailey

Brown Women In The Ring: Review of Ring Shout by P. Djèlí Clark

Brown Women In The Ring: Review of Ring Shout by P. Djèlí Clark J. Frank Beane Under Review: Ring Shout. P. Djèlí Clark. Tordotcom, 2020. P. Djèlí Clark’s unapologetically Black novella Ring Shout is an excellent example of a book in the fantasy subgenre of Black magic. Other books in this subgenre include Nalo Hopkinson’s … Continue reading Brown Women In The Ring: Review of Ring Shout by P. Djèlí Clark

The World is Broken, I’m Not: Review of Glitter + Ashes: Queer Tales of a World That Wouldn’t Die, ed. dave ring

The World is Broken, I’m Not: Review of Glitter + Ashes: Queer Tales of a World that Wouldn’t Die, ed. dave ring Ceci Mancuso Under Review: Glitter + Ashes: Queer Tales of a World that Wouldn't Die. dave ring, editor. Neon Hemlock, 2020. Neon Hemlock’s Glitter + Ashes: Queer Tales of a World That Didn’t … Continue reading The World is Broken, I’m Not: Review of Glitter + Ashes: Queer Tales of a World That Wouldn’t Die, ed. dave ring

Between Black and White: Review of The Vanishing Half by Brit Bennett

Between Black and White: Review of The Vanishing Half by Brit Bennett Ashumi Shah Under Review: The Vanishing Half. Brit Bennett. Riverhead Books, 2020. In the sociological sense, “passing” is a deceptively simple term for a complex concept. Passing—the ability of an individual to be regarded as a member of an identity group or category … Continue reading Between Black and White: Review of The Vanishing Half by Brit Bennett

Detecting Agency and Ethics: Review of Fortune Favors the Dead by Stephen Spotswood

Detecting Agency and Ethics: Review of Fortune Favors the Dead by Stephen Spotswood Marisa Mercurio Under Review: Fortune Favors the Dead. Stephen Spotswood. Doubleday, 2020. Amid calls for police abolition and budget cuts, scrutiny of American crime media—a genre inspired by police detectives—has yielded further reflections on law enforcement’s pervasiveness within our society. Literary depictions … Continue reading Detecting Agency and Ethics: Review of Fortune Favors the Dead by Stephen Spotswood

Cold War Dragons and Everyday Magic: Review of Burn by Patrick Ness

Cold War Dragons and Everyday Magic: Review of Burn by Patrick Ness Ibtisam Ahmed Under Review: Burn. Patrick Ness. Quill Tree Books, 2020. At its best, speculative fiction is a wonderfully paradoxical genre. Amidst the vibrant worldbuilding and lore lies an ability to poignantly reflect on issues pertaining to the real world. So, when I … Continue reading Cold War Dragons and Everyday Magic: Review of Burn by Patrick Ness